F rom well-crafted Deadpool costumes to perfectly executed Harlequin make-up, the Canberra Cosplay community make it look effortless when showing off their outfits at conventions such as the Impact Comics Festival and CanCon. As someone wanting to one-day cosplay, I cannot help but wonder, what goes on in the sewing room?

Debri Madhatter

Picture: Debri Cosplay

Sitting down with two Canberra Cosplayers, Bri Edmonds (Debri Cosplay) and Jacob Murnane (Mischievous Cosplay and Games), I first ask what exactly is cosplay?

“Cosplay for me is dressing up as a character and representing them, or having fun and dressing up with friends. But I suppose if you wanna be really technical cosplay is costume play”, said Bri.

Jacob Munrane believes there is a misconception about Cosplay.

“A lot of people think that it’s limited to T.V. shows or movies. But I’ve seen someone who dressed as Aragon before the movie (Lord of the Rings) was made and designed the costume based on the description in the book, so cosplay is not just what you can see, it’s what you make of the character as well,” said Jacob.

The costumes are extravagant for sure, but how much work goes into making them?

“I think my quickest most complicated costume was my Mad Hatters one that took me a week…otherwise I do have one that I have worked on for about two months now and that’s probably the longest that I will work on a cosplay for,” said Bri.

Jacob agrees with his counterpart.

“It also depends on the detail in the costume. My Reaper costume is going to take close to 5 months of preparation, not only is it a head to toe piece, you’ve got some insane angles on it. The eyes will light up and it’s got L.E.D.S (Light-emitting diodes) included in the weapons. Not only do I have to physically make them (the weapons) and have to holster them like the actual character does, but I have to put the L.E.D.S in them as well and that alone is a lot of work,” Jacob said.

Jacob Cosplay

Picture: Mischievous Cosplay and Games

When asked about the costs of Cosplaying Bri answered without hesitation.

“A minimum cost of $200 per cosplay. That’s so you’ll have everything for it, because things like wigs can cost you from thirty dollars up, because you want quality,” Bri said.

Jacobs Reaper costume is going to cost him over $700 and Bri mentioned a friend of hers who commissioned a cosplay outfit that cost $1500. Although none of that seems to matter to Bri.

“Yes Cosplay can cost you thousands. You do have cosplayers who go for the cheaper option and sometimes it does show, but so long as they have fun it’s all good at the end of the day,” she said with a smile.

Now knowing the cost and hard work behind the look, I see sewing lessons in my future and the raiding of a piggy bank.

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